Basics

216 N Marshall Ave
Litchfield MN 55355

(320)693-2483

HOURS
Monday - Thursday 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday & Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday

Friday, December 7, 2012

Beth and I are Getting Confused!

By Jan Pease

Since Beth reviewed books she read for her class on children’s literature, I’m turning the tables to look at a few books that are found in the adult area of the library. 

A co-worker introduced me to the Kate Burkholder Series, which feature a   female chief of police in a small town in Ohio who grew up in the local Amish community.  The books in the series are “Sworn to Silence,” “Pray for Silence,” “Breaking Silence,” and “Gone Missing.” Publisher’s Weekly called the book overwrought, but I enjoyed the sense of time and place and liked Kate as a character.  P.L. Gaus is the writer who first hooked me on mysteries set in Amish communities, and his books are perhaps a bit more satisfying. Read “Clouds Without Rain” or “Blood of the Prodigal.”  But Linda Castillo writes a good story, and sometimes I just like a fun read. 


I started using a free, devotional e-book recently, “Walking with Frodo: A Devotional Journey through the Lord of the Rings,” by Sarah Arthur.   I have been a fan of The Lord of the Rings since about 1967, have all the movies, and am waiting expectantly for part one of “The Hobbit,” directed by Peter Jackson.  Combining thoughts and readings from the LOTR books and movies with the Bible may seem to be an odd combination, but it works for me.      

Middle School and High School book clubs are reading “A Long Walk to Water”, by Linda Sue Park.  This book is nominated for the 2013 Maud Hart Lovelace Award in Division II.  Based on the experiences of Salva Dut, founder of Water for South Sudan, “A Long Walk to Water” is a poignant look at a part of the world we prefer not to think about. I found it interesting to read about well drilling projects at www.thewaterproject.org and www.waterforsouthsudan.org.

I may or may not be Irish on my father’s side, so “The Graves are Are Walking: the Great Famine and the saga of the Irish People,” by John Kelly, intrigued me.  Our lives are so comfortable that it is difficult to imagine what drove so many people to try to make a new life in America. I’m still working my way through “The Graves are Walking.” It’s really difficult to read about the famine and the unbelievable response of the British government.    Mr. Kelly is also well known for his book about the ravages of plague, “The Great Mortality: An Intimate History of the Black Death, the Most Devastating Plague of All Time.” When I’m finished with the Irish devastation, I may tackle the Black Death. Cheerful thought. “The Great Mortality” is available at the Litchfield library, and “The Graves are Walking” is available through interlibrary loan.
 

Finally, of all my guilty pleasures, the Dresden books by Jim Butcher are at the top of the list.  In “Cold Days,” Harry Dresden, urban wizard, continues his fight against the forces of darkness, having survived everything from zombie dinosaurs to a near-death experience. If you’ve read “Ghost Story,” you know that although Harry died, he was only absent.  His adventures away from his corporeal body are explained, but you just have to read the entire series, which hasn’t run out of steam even though this is the 14th Dresden novel. 

Remember that the December book sale is this Saturday, December 15, starting at 10.  See you at the library!